History part 2, I guess!

I think where we left off last time was the basic discovery that home education was an option, and the decision to give it a try (maybe up until Big turned 7, when he would have gone to school in Sweden).

I seem to remember, in the summer of 1999, having made the decision to home educate, then wondering how on earth we would do it. I had the Charlotte Mason principles outlined in the book “For the Children’s Sake“, but surely I would need resources?

Oddly enough, although I had no thought of specifically Christian home education at that time, I remember randomly looking in Wesley Owen in Watford, a Christian bookshop which is sadly no more. I asked at the counter whether they carried any resources for homeschooling (I did not realise at that time that homeschooling is an American word which is not appropriate to British home educators – more on that another time).

They didn’t have any resources, but with one of those random co-incidences, another customer at the counter heard my question and piped up that he knew somebody (his sister?) who was doing this, and he had the details of a Christian organisation who supported home educators in the UK, The Home Service, which he was able to supply there and then.

Given that among the small home educating population in the UK, the Christian portion of that number is very small (in comparison to the US where a large proportion of homeschoolers are religious), the chances of this meeting seem so unlikely, it is one of those co-incidences that make me suspect there is no such thing as co-incidence (if you know what I mean)!

This contact propelled me into a world of Christian home education that has shaped my thinking about life, the universe and everything, the resources we have used (mainly American) and gave rise to some very sweet and long-term friendships, not to mention a sizeable detour out of Christianity into Judaism and back into Christianity via Messianic Judaism. It’s a long story, spanning more than ten years, with many twists and turns, and I’m not sure how this personal journey has shaped our home education or my children’s worldview – perhaps I shall be able to analyse that as I write in more detail about that journey.

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2 thoughts on “History part 2, I guess!

    • It is a lovely book, I may dedicate a whole post to it. If you have heard of Francis Schaeffer the theologian of L’Abri in Switzerland, the author Susan is his daughter.

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